Revitalizing Public Service: Insights from Max Stier President and CEO, Partnership for Public Service

 

Revitalizing Public Service: Insights from Max Stier President and CEO, Partnership for Public Service

Friday, May 25th, 2012 - 13:54
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Sam Heyman founded the Partnership for Public Service in September 2001 to address the need for reform in government service.

Today the country faces challenges of unprecedented complexity, from guiding an economy through crisis to expanding healthcare coverage. To meet these and a myriad of other challenges will require transforming the way government works while also inspiring the best and brightest to choose public service.

Building, energizing, and maintaining a high-quality workforce is the key to success for any organization and the federal government is no exception. How does the Partnership for Public Service seek to inspire a new generation to serve? What is the Partnership for Public Service doing to transform the way government works? And what are some of the key human capital and workforce challenges facing the
federal government? We will explore these questions and so much more with our very special guest Max Stier, president and CEO of the Partnership for Public Service. The following provides an edited excerpt from our interview.

 

Max, before we delve into specific initiatives, perhaps you could give us an overview of the history and evolving mission of the Partnership for Public Service. What prompted its creation and how has it evolved since its inception?

Max Stier: Sam Heyman founded the Partnership for Public Service in September 2001 to address the need for reform in government
service. In 1963, Sam was a newly minted Harvard law graduate and did what about a third of his class did at that time, which was go into the government. He met Bobby Kennedy two or three times in his first year at the Department of Justice. It was an experience that stayed with him throughout his professional life. He stayed five years and took what he thought would just be a leave of absence to wind up the family business when his dad died. Instead, he wound up becoming an even more successful businessman than his father. Fast-forward several decades, Sam learned from the then-dean of the Harvard Law School that they were no longer in a world in which a third of the top students went into government. It was more like two or three percent of graduates going into government. This concerned Sam. He became very interested in why talent was no longer going into government in the same way it had when he graduated from law school. He ultimately concluded that he needed to put his oar in and start a nonprofit; that was the real genesis of the Partnership. Its mission is to think about how you attract the right talent into government. I put together a business plan. It focused on both the talent side—drawing the
right talent into public service—but as important, helping government manage that talent effectively. These areas are the cornerstones of our mission.

Read the entire interview.

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