performance

 

performance

Weekly Roundup: February 12-16, 2018

Friday, February 16th, 2018 - 17:55
John Kamensky Feb 12 – 16

Conversations with Authors: John Kamensky on Cross-Agency Collaboration: A Case Study of Cross Agency Priority Goals

Friday, February 9th, 2018 - 15:34
Phrase: 
How were the initial Cross-Agency Priority Goals (CAP) goals implemented? What has been the impact of the initial CAP goals? How can we improve the implementation of the next round of CAP goals? Join us as we explore these questions and more with John Kamensky, Senior Fellow at the IBM Center and author of Cross-Agency Collaboration: A Case Study of Cross Agency Priority Goals.
Radio show date: 
Mon, 02/12/2018
Guest: 
Intro text: 
How were the initial Cross-Agency Priority Goals (CAP) goals implemented? What has been the impact of the initial CAP goals? How can we improve the implementation of the next round of CAP goals? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions and more with John Kamensky, Senior Fellow at the IBM Center and author of Cross-Agency Collaboration: A Case Study of Cross Agency Priority Goals next week on The Business of Government Hour.

Reflections on Reform: Implementing Management Reform

Tuesday, January 30th, 2018 - 15:20
Blog Co-Author: Mark Abramson, Leadership Inc. This blog is two in a series.  The IBM Center for The Business of Government turns 20 this year. To commemorate this milestone, we are undertaking a year-long effort to both look back over the last 20 years and to look ahead to envision what government might look like in the next 20 years.

Next Steps in Improving Government Performance

Monday, January 29th, 2018 - 14:48
A new study released today by the National Academy of Public Administration says there has been a missing step.

Evolution of Performance Management in Government

Thursday, January 18th, 2018 - 13:56
First, as argued in an earlier column, there is a big difference between comprehensive, whole-of-government approaches (budgeting, performance budgeting, outcome-budgeting and performance agreements) and partial approaches to performance improvement (ISO 9000, Lean Sigma, etc.). Partial approaches are akin to arranging chairs on the deck of Titanic. In a dysfunctional system, looking for pockets of excellence is a futile exercise.

The Future Has Begun! Using Artificial Intelligence to Transform Government

Tuesday, January 9th, 2018 - 12:09
By: 
Blog Co-Author: Claude Yusti, Partner, IBM Global Business Services Government agencies are being challenged to provide more and better services. At the same time, agencies face budget and resource constraints. Some organizations are looking at how to reinvent their programs for serving citizens. This environment places a premium on investigating and testing new approaches -- one of the most intriguing such approach involves the use of artificial intelligence, or AI.

Conversations with Authors: John Whitley on Five Actions to Improve Military Hospital Performance

Monday, January 8th, 2018 - 14:13
Phrase: 
What challenges does the US Department of Defense’s direct care system face? How can these challenges be overcome? What are five actions to improve military hospital performance? Join host Michael Keegan next week on a Special Edition of The Business of Government Hour as he explores these questions and more with John Whitley, author of the IBM Center report, Five Actions to Improve Military Hospital Performance.
Radio show date: 
Mon, 01/08/2018
Guest: 
Intro text: 
What challenges does the US Department of Defense’s direct care system face? How can these challenges be overcome? What are five actions to improve military hospital performance? Join host Michael Keegan next week on a Special Edition of The Business of Government Hour as he explores these questions and more with John Whitley, author of the IBM Center report, Five Actions to Improve Military Hospital Performance.

How to Prevent Soft-targeting in Government Performance Management Systems

Monday, December 11th, 2017 - 15:05
It is, therefore, hardly surprising that the preference for “soft-targets” is a near universal phenomenon. Anyone designing a government performance management system (GPMS) must assume we humans have a preference for soft targets. Given this seemingly reasonable assumption about human behavior, the key to designing an effective GPMS lies in creating protocols that tend to create incentives for those covered by the GPMS in such a way that the pursuit of one’s own ‘self-interest’ promotes the desired ‘public interest.’ I have found following design elements to be helpful in this regard.

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Michael Keegan
By Michael J. Keegan

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How to Design Effective Team Targets in Government

Monday, November 13th, 2017 - 12:17
The Challenge Government is famously a team sport. Almost everything (really) important we do in government requires effective teams. Whether it is reducing child mortality, disaster management, fighting opioid crisis or stopping money laundering. The list is indeed long and familiar.