Social Media Trends in Gov for 2010

I am not a tech-toy pioneer. It was two years before I logged onto my company’s instant message system because I thought it would create ADD symptoms (it didn’t). I just got a Blackberry a few weeks ago (yes, Blackberry, not iPhone) because I lost my PalmPilot calendar and they don’t make them anymore. And I resisted a Twitter account because I thought it was silly, frivolous, and seemingly narcissistic.

New Tools for Collaboration: The Experience of the U.S. Intelligence Community

The purpose of this report is to learn lessons by looking at the use of internal collaborative tools across the Intelligence Community. The initial rubric was tools, but the real focus is collaboration, for while the tools can enable, what ultimately matters are policies and practices interacting with organizational culture. It looks for good practices to emulate. The ultimate question is how and how much could, and should, collaborative tools foster integration across the Community.

Participatory Budgeting: Ten Actions to Engage Citizens via Social Media

It has since spread to 1,000 other cities worldwide and is gaining interest in U.S. cities as well. Dr. Gordon’s report offers an overview of the state of participatory budgeting, and the potential value of integrating the use of social media into the participatory process design. Her report details three case studies of U.S.

Using Crowdsourcing In Government

The growing interest in “engaging the crowd” to identify or develop innovative solutions to public problems has been inspired by similar efforts in the commercial world.  There, crowdsourcing has been successfully used to design innovative consumer products or solve complex scientific problems, ranging from custom-designed T-shirts to mapping genetic DNA strands. 

A Best Practices Guide for Mitigating Risk in the Use of Social Media

Read the report.

Social media continue to grow across the globe, and the United States federal government is no exception. The administration and Congress actively and increasingly use social media to communicate, to take information in, and to collaborate across boundaries. Yet the benefits of increased involvement through social media also raise new risks to the security of agency information.

Assessing Public Participation in an Open Government Era

The plans of top agencies have been assessed by both the government and advocacy groups to see if they met the requirements laid out in the directives, often with an emphasis on the degree to which they increase transparency.  This report focuses on how well these agency plans increase public participation and collaboration.  

Using Online Tools to Engage – and be Engaged by –The Public

Mr. Leighninger’s report begins to pull back the veil on how the various online engagement tactics and tools can be used, and when they work best.  

His report describes common scenarios where public managers may find themselves needing, or using, public input.  He describe a mix of ten different tactics managers may find useful for engaging the public online and highlights over 40 different technologies in use today to support those kinds of engagements.

How Federal Agencies Can Effectively Manage Records Created Using New Social Media Tools

To date, federal agencies have largely been on their own in terms of how to manage records created via social media tools.  This historically decentralized approach has resulted in some agencies banning the use of social media while other agencies have rapidly adopted their use but ignored the potential records management implications.  The National Archives and Records Administration released a bulletin on managing social media records at the same time this report was released.  It offered some “guidance to Federal agencies, who must then determine the most appropriate ways to incorporate

Government in 3D: How Public Leaders Can Draw on Virtual Worlds

This report is an example of how Web 2.0's "teen toys" have become a serious work tool. It explores how cutting-edge government organizations are using 3-dimensional virtual worlds on the Internet to conduct training, recruit new employees, and educate the public. It also provides a guide to how virtual worlds have become a fast-growing social phenomenon that believe that, by the end of 2011, fully 80 percent of all active internet users will be participating in 3-D virtual worlds.

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