Drivers Transforming Government: People

Note:  The IBM Center recently released Seven Drivers Transforming Government, a series of essays exploring key drivers of change in government. It is based on our research and numerous insights shared by current and former government officials.  This blog is the fifth in a series of excerpts from each of the seven essays.

How to Prevent Soft-targeting in Government Performance Management Systems

It is, therefore, hardly surprising that the preference for “soft-targets” is a near universal phenomenon. Anyone designing a government performance management system (GPMS) must assume we humans have a preference for soft targets.

Announcing the Center’s Newest Research Report Topics

We are pleased to announce our latest round of awards for new reports on key public sector challenges, which respond to priorities identified in the Center's research agenda(for more detail on these priorities, see “Seven Drivers Transforming Government”). Our content is intended to stimulate and accelerate the production of practical research that benefits government leaders and managers.

Seven Drivers Transforming Government

In 2018, the IBM Center for The Business of Government marks its twentieth year of connecting research to practice in helping to improve government. The IBM Center continues to execute on its ultimate mission: to assist public sector executives and managers in addressing real world problems with practical ideas and original thinking to improve government.

Transforming Government Through Technology

The federal government can reduce costs while improving services by adapting private sector cost reduction strategies and technologies to achieve similar benefits in government. This objective is highlighted by a recent report, led by the Technology CEO Council (TCC), in which the IBM Center for The Business of Government participated.

Making Government Work for the American People

The success of an administration can rise—and fall—based on its competence in managing the government. As history demonstrates, strong management can enable rapid and positive results, while management mistakes can derail important policy initiatives, erode public trust and undermine confidence in the government.

Encouraging and Sustaining Innovation in Government

According to a 2015 survey by Pew Research Center, the public believes existing democratic institutions are failing. Just 20 percent say the federal government runs its programs well, and 59 percent say the government is in need of “very major reform”—up 22 points since 19971. With rates of trust in government at an all-time low, technology and innovation will be essential to achieve the next administration’s goals and to deliver services more effectively and effciently.

Building an Enterprise Government

In January 2017, the next administration will begin the hard work of implementing the President’s priorities. Regardless of the specific policies, implementation in many cases will require working across agency boundaries. By taking an “enterprise government” approach – starting in the transition and continuing into the White House – the next administration can deliver on their promises more effectively.

Using Mobile Apps in Government

More than 90 percent now own a cell phone, and three-quarters of those are smartphones. Mobile apps—first introduced in 2008—have become an essential tool for commercial services, such as music, weather, and shopping. In fact, the average smartphone user has about 40 apps on their device.

Managing the Government’s Executive Talent

For the next administration, the management of the federal workforce—including executives—will be a critical factor in the president’s success. The president’s political appointees will work with members of the career Senior Executive Service (SES) to direct the work of agencies and departments.

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