Implementing the National Health Information Technology Agenda

The U.S. healthcare system has a history of innovation marked by the ability to translate basic research into new clinical and therapeutic approaches that sustain human life and health. Such success brings with it significant challenges.

Actionable Cybersecurity Practices for the 21st Century: Perspectives from Experts

The IBM Center recently partnered with the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) and George Washington University Center for Cyber and Homeland Security to convene a set of interactive discussions among Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) and other security executives in government and industry.  The meeting highlighted challenges and opportunities for action.

Insider Threats Part I: Background and Organizations Working to Counter Insider Threats

Yet, the seriousness of Insider Threats motivates the ongoing efforts to implement systems and processes to inhibit their effects.  As the first in a three-part series on Insider Threats, this blog seeks to address the following:

Part (1) What are the key organizations working on the Insider Threat problem (the post below, followed by the next two parts).

Part (2) current and recommended strategies to countering Insider Threats, and

Part (3) potential future strategies to counter Insider Threats.

Defining an Insider Threat

Insider Threats Part II: Current and Recommended Strategies to Mitigate Insider Threats

The first blog in this series presented information about Insider Threat policies and key organizations working to prevent Insider Threats.  This blog will focus on current, IT-based, and recommended, whole-person risk-rating, efforts to detect and prevent Insider Threats.  The next blog post w

Drivers Transforming Government: Risk

Note: The IBM Center recently released Seven Drivers Transforming Government, a series of essays exploring key drivers of change in government. It is based on our research and numerous insights shared by current and former government officials. This blog is the fourth in a series of excerpts from each of the seven essays.

Sea, Land, Air, Space Superiority – Why are Near-Peer Adversaries able to Excel?

Guest Blogger: Townley Cozad, Associate Partner, Defense & Intelligence, IBM

 

Even as the United States remains the strongest, most capable military in the world, U.S. leadership in all domains is being challenged by “near-peer” competitors aggressively seeking to close the capability gap.  The military calls this “near-peer” (against someone who has similar weapons and abilities) warfare.

Managing Advanced Threats in the Digital Age: Addressing security, risk and compliance for U.S. Public Sector executives

These attacks are relentless, aggressive and constantly evolving, and have clearly shown that federal agencies and organizations are struggling in managing security threats, despite the stricter security protocols that are often in place at government agencies. Cyber threats are “among the most urgent dangers to America’s economic and national security,” President Obama was quoted as saying in a Wall Street Journal article in 2015.

Defining a Framework for Decision Making in Cyberspace

This report is the product of a group of experts, which was convened by the Department of Computer Science at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP). IUP brought together an interdisciplinary panel of experts in national security, international relations, foreign policy, information system network and security, public policy, and computer science. These experts participated in two collaborative roundtable meetings during the first six months of 2014.

2012 Call for Research Report Proposals

Our aim is to produce research and analysis that helps government leaders more effectively respond to their mission and management challenges.The IBM Center is named "The Business of Government" because its focus is the management and operation of government, not the policies of government. Public sector leaders and managers need the best, most practical advice available when it comes to delivering the business of government.

Assessing the Value of Intelligence: Lessons for Leaders

Applying power in all its forms to secure the present and future is ultimately a leadership challenge. That challenge is especially complex in the current century when the forms and patterns of security are changing in so many ways at an accelerated pace than ever before. The capabilities required to threaten a nation, region, or even global stability are available to both rich and impoverished nation states, as well as small networks of people who can and do operate relatively independent of any nation state. There is more data available than ever before to make sense of this era.

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