Weekly Round-up, June 24, 2011

Articles from across the Web we found interesting, the week of June 20, 2011

Gadi Ben-Yehuda

Seven Management Imperatives: Imperative Two: Leverage Hyperconnectivity

The technologies that enable hyperconnectivity can be harnessed, ignored, employed on an ad-hoc basis, or incorporated thoughtfully into an agency’s strategy to carry out its mission. The only thing that leaders and managers cannot do with these technologies is make them go away.
 

Weekly Round-up: July 01, 2011

Articles from around the Web we found interesting, the week of June 27, 2011

Gadi Ben-Yehuda

Seven Imperatives: Imperative Three: Manage through Collaboration

Governments are increasing their use of collaboration by: creating ad hoc networks in response to emergencies, and aligning governmental and nongovernmental organizations to work interdependently to achieve common goals.
 

Weekly Round-up - July 08, 2011

Articles from across the Web that we found interesting, the week of July 04, 2011
 

Gadi Ben-Yehuda

Seven Management Imperatives: Imperative Four - Use Real-Time Performance Data

In the coming years, government executives will need to utilize real-time information for decision-making and accountability. Specifically, they must (1) Collect better data; (2) Conduct better analysis; (3) Make better decisions; and (4) Take smarter action.

Weekly Round-up: June 03, 2011

Gadi Ben-Yehuda

Three Ways to Improve @WhiteHouse (or Any Large Communications-intensive Organization)

The White House Twitter feed recently created a survey and asked followers to submit their opinions on how they liked @WhiteHouse and how the @WhiteHouse team could improve their feed.  Here is a quick list of three suggestions that would improve @WhiteHouse - or any other communications-intensive organization.

1. Use hashtags

Weekly Round-up: June 10, 2011

Gadi Ben-Yehuda

Seven Management Imperatives: Introduction

The IBM Center is committed to helping government executives and managers address real world management challenges with practical ideas and original thinking.

Over the last 13 years, we published more than 300 research reports and interviewed some 300 senior government executives.  It is from this rich library that we’ve identified several broad societal trends that we believe are changing what it takes to be a successful leader at all levels of government.

Pages

Innovation Fellow, Emeritus
IBM Center for The Business of Government
600 14th Street, NW Second Floor
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Gadi Ben-Yehuda was our Innovation Fellow for the Center for The Business of Government. In the five years that Mr. Ben-Yehuda was with the Center, he was a speaker, panelist and moderator for events with State Department, Department of Labor, Department of Defense, General Services Administration, and other agencies. He also delivered presentations both nationally and internationally, at SxSW Interactive Festival in Austin, TX, the Global eGovernment Forum in Seoul, South Korea, and conferences in venues ranging from Washington, DC, to New York City, and Las Vegas, NV, to Burlington, VT. He was a prolific writer, with articles appearing on the Center’s blog, in Government Executive and Fast CoExist. He is active on Facebook, Twitter, and Vine. Mr. Ben-Yehuda has worked on the Web since 1994, when he received an email from Maya Angelou through his first Web site. He has an MFA in poetry from American University, has taught writing at Howard University, and has worked in Washington, DC, for nonprofits, lobbying organizations, Fleishman-Hillard Global Communications, and Al Gore's presidential campaign. Prior to his current position, Gadi was was a Web Strategist for the District of Columbia's Office of the chief Technology Officer (OCTO). Additionally, Gadi has taught creative, expository, and Web writing for more than 10 years to university students, private-sector professionals, and soldiers, including Marines at the Barracks at 8th and I in Washington, DC. Gadi is also a member of ACT-IAC.

Your cart

Your cart is empty.