Weekly Roundup: December 24-28, 2018

Big Pay Increase? Government Executive reports: “Trump must issue an executive order [by December 31] prescribing changes to both basic pay and locality pay for next year, even if that change is zero. . . . If the White House does not issue that order, automatic salary increases will take effect,. . . .

Conversation with Authors: Professors Lael Keiser and Susan Miller

Lael R. Keiser is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and in the Truman School of Public Affairs at the University of Missouri, where she teaches courses on public policy and public administration. Her research focuses on policy implementation in public agencies with a focus on Social Security Disability, Veterans Disability Compensation, and public education.

Co-Delivery: Beyond Traditional Citizen Engagement

How can governments at all levels engage their citizens in ways that are more meaningful – and fun -- to both the citizens and their community? A series of pioneering initiatives hold new promise that this now can be done on a much wider scale.

Leadership: It Depends on the Deck You've Been Dealt (Part 4)

But in reality, the success of a leader depends on the context, or environment, in which they work – the deck they’ve been dealt. Even the heroes. 

But as the context – the workplace, the workers, and the work – change (because we are in more of a knowledge-based economy) -- a different type of leader tends to be more successful, especially when the challenge is cross-agency and/or cross-sector. The “lone hero” isn’t always the most effective leader in this new world.  In fact, the best leaders tend to share leadership in any large-scale change effort.  For example: 

What's the Recipe for Good (Collaborative) Relationships?

With Valentine’s Day approaching, there are all sorts of advice columns about improving relationships.  Well, A new IBM Center report by Dr. Jane Fountain, Implementing Cross-Agency Collaboration: A Guide for Federal Managers, offers advice on successful cross-agency relationships.  She says there is a recipe for success, but that it depends on a number of factors.

Throwing Rocks and Birds

In 2002, British academic Jake Chapman wrote a paper for Demos, a UK think tank, entitled: “System Failure:  Why Governments Must Learn to Think Differently.” It is based on his experiences in working with large government challenges, especially in the energy and health care sectors.  In his paper, he contrasts the traditional, linear approach to problem-solving with a more holistic, systemic approach.  He says it is like the difference between throwing a rock and a live bird:

Tri-Sector Leadership Skills

An article in the September issue of Harvard Business Review by Nick Lovegrove and Matthew Thomas tries to explain why.  They examine the careers of leaders who have been successful in addressing complex challenges requiring collaboration across a wide range of stakeholders. They cite Harvard Kennedy School professor Joseph Nye, who says that these kinds of leaders have the ability to “engage and collaborate across the private, public, and social sectors.”

Collaborating to Make a Difference

In May, the VA announced a partnership with two veterans service organizations --  the Disabled American Veterans and The American Legion -- to reduce the backlog of claims for veterans benefits by encouraging the filing of “fully developed claims.”  Such claims can be expedited in half the time it takes to process a regular claim.

Health IT - Better Healthcare at Lower Cost? Interview with Dr. Farzad Mostashari, National Coordinator for Health IT

Health Information Technology or Health IT has the potential to transform the practice of healthcare by reducing cost, improving quality, and enabling a patient centered approach to care.

Four Elements That Promote Effective Coordination

“Interagency coordination is an essential ele­ment of effective public leadership,” writes Dr. Andrea Strimling Yodsampa in a new report for the IBM Center on effective practices for interagency coordination, using U.S. civil-military coordination efforts in Afghanistan between 2001- 2009 as a case study.

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