Key Features of Cross-Agency Collaborative Mechanisms

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has developed an inventory of “mechanisms that the federal government uses to lead and implement interagency collaboration,” along with a self-assessment checklist to consider when using them.

GAO’s latest study on collaborative governance is based on an analysis of more than 300 past GAO reports covering issues such as homeland security, agriculture, and health, as well as a series of interviews with experts on the topic.

Building an Analytics Culture

Investing in, and using, program evaluation has been a hard sell in many agencies for years.  While evaluation is important for long-term program assessments, it can be expensive and take years to complete.  But with new technology and greater availability of data, many agencies are beginning to take advantage of the value of existing real-time administrative data.  This movement is called “data analytics.”  And the immediacy of results is appealing to many executives.

Government Reform: Insights for the Future of the Movement (Part 6)

  • Strong statutory and institutional structures and an investment in performance management systems seem to be more common in emerging countries.  For example, in Columbia this is embedded in their constitution and Kenya has created a department to lead the nation’s transformation efforts.  In more developed countries such as the United Kingdom and Ireland, these efforts are more administratively-based, oftentimes at the discretion of the prime minister.

The Next Four Years: Managing a Balancing Act

Twenty years ago, federal agencies typically did not have senior executives leading key mission support functions such as finance, technology, acquisition, or workforce.  Over those two decades, Congress created a series of “chief” positions, reflecting trends in the private sector – chief financial officers, chief information technology officers, chief acquisition officers, and chief human capital officers.  They recently added performance improvement officers but without the “chief” title.

Government Reform: Inspirations from Developing Countries (Part 5)

four developing countries.

The World Bank seminars this past Spring continue to have me mulling about the progress of the performance movement internationally, and how surprised I was that several countries seem to be putting foundations for performance in place at two or three times the speed of more developed countries.  Four countries struck me as making notable progress, which are summarized in earlier blog posts:  Colombia, South Africa, Kenya, and Malaysia:

Government Reform: Kenya and Malaysia (Part 4)

The World Bank seminars this past Spring continue to have me mulling about the progress of the performance movement internationally, and how surprised I was that several countries seem to be putting foundations for performance in place at two or three times the speed of more developed countries.  Four countries struck me as making notable progress.  I summarized two in a previous post (Colombia and South Africa).  Today I’ll focus on Kenya and Malaysia:

Government Reform: Colombia and South Africa (Part 3)

The World Bank seminars this past Spring on international progress in performance management continue to have me mulling about the progress of the performance movement internationally, and how surprised I was that several countries seem to be putting foundations for performance in place at two or three times the speed of more developed countries.  Four countries struck me as making notable progress.  I’ll summarize two today and two in my next post – along with notes on their commonalities:

Government Reform: The New Zealand Example (Part 2)

At the World Bank’s series of forums on performance management, I found John Whitehead’s insights particularly interesting.  Whitehead is a former secretary of the Treasury in New Zealand, which has been touted as the most advanced in performance-oriented government reform.  He looked back on what worked and what did not in their reform efforts over the past 25 years.  New Zealand’s effor

OMB Guidance: What Is a Program?

Earlier this Spring, Senator Tom Coburn grilled an OMB witness at a hearing about why OMB had not yet implemented a provision in the GPRA Modernization Act requiring the creation of a government-wide inventory of all existing programs.  He pointed to a list developed by the Department of Education and wondered why this was not done by every agency in government.

OMB Guidance: Prepare to SOAR

Agencies will have to put this new approach in place over the next two years.

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Senior Fellow
IBM Center for The Business of Government
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202-551-9341

Mr. Kamensky is a Senior Fellow with the IBM Center for The Business of Government and an Associate Partner with IBM's Global Business Services.

During 24 years of public service, he had a significant role in helping pioneer the federal government's performance and results orientation. Mr. Kamensky is passionate about helping transform government to be more results-oriented, performance-based, customer-driven, and collaborative in nature.

Prior to joining the IBM Center, he served for eight years as deputy director of Vice President Gore's National Partnership for Reinventing Government. Before that, he worked at the Government Accountability Office where he played a key role in the development and passage of the Government Performance and Results Act.

Since joining the IBM Center, he has co-edited six books and writes and speaks extensively on performance management and government reform.  Current areas of emphasis include transparency, collaboration, and citizen engagement.  He also blogs about management challenges in government.

Mr. Kamensky is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and received a Masters in Public Affairs from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, in Austin, Texas. He can be reached at: john.kamensky@us.ibm.com

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