Senior Fellow
IBM Center for The Business of Government
600 14th Street, NW Second Floor
Washington, DC 20005
United States
202-551-9341

Mr. Kamensky is a Senior Fellow with the IBM Center for The Business of Government and an Associate Partner with IBM's Global Business Services.

During 24 years of public service, he had a significant role in helping pioneer the federal government's performance and results orientation. Mr. Kamensky is passionate about helping transform government to be more results-oriented, performance-based, customer-driven, and collaborative in nature.

Prior to joining the IBM Center, he served for eight years as deputy director of Vice President Gore's National Partnership for Reinventing Government. Before that, he worked at the Government Accountability Office where he played a key role in the development and passage of the Government Performance and Results Act.

Since joining the IBM Center, he has co-edited six books and writes and speaks extensively on performance management and government reform.  Current areas of emphasis include transparency, collaboration, and citizen engagement.  He also blogs about management challenges in government.

Mr. Kamensky is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and received a Masters in Public Affairs from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, in Austin, Texas. He can be reached at: john.kamensky@us.ibm.com

Evolving the Workforce for A.I. Adoption

Guest blogger: Doug McGovern, Chief Technology Officer for Intelligence Programs, IBM Global Business Services

This panel was part of a Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) workshop held at the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency’s (NGA) headquarters in Springfield Virginia and was attended by industry, academia and Government. Keynotes were provided by several Government Senior Executives from the Intelligence Community.

Weekly Roundup: November 27 – December 1, 2017

John Kamensky

FEMA’s Resilience Reset. RouteFifty reports: “State and local governments should own the disaster recovery process by creating integrated, outcome-based mitigation plans like Puerto Rico post-Hurricane Maria, the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s administrator said Thursday at a congressional hearing on Capitol Hill.”

Re-Imagining Government Modernization

Guest blogger: Tim Stitely, IBM Vice President for Federal Healthcare

As the Former Chief Information Officer for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and a civil servant for over 20 years from the level of clerk typist through the Senior Executive Service, I have seen many "Modernization" initiatives to optimize and otherwise change Government. Sometimes this is process-oriented or people-driven, and usually lands a lot on technology. The initiatives have come under many names, including Reinventing Government and the President’s Management Agenda.

Weekly Roundup: December 4-8, 2017

John Kamensky

Disaster Response: Brings Out the Best in Feds. Government Executive covered the SES Rank Awards ceremony.  Both SBA Administrator Linda McMahon and Homeland Security Deputy Secretary Elaine Duke praised the dedication and response of thousands of career civil servants to the three major hurricanes in recent months.

Motivating Workers

“The key to motivation turns out to be largely within your control,” write Teresa Amabile and Steven Kramer in the January 2010 issue of Harvard Business Review. How? “. . . scrupulously avoid impeding progress.”

Amabile and Kramer surveyed more than 600 managers, and then asked hundreds of knowledge workers to keep daily diaries to find out what was the top motivator of performance.

Blog Index: Sept - Dec 2009

Following is an index of blog entries between the start, September 1, 2009, and the end of the year, December 31, 2009, organized around some major themes.

Web 2.0 and Social Media

Launching the BizGov Blog (09-01-09)

Blogs as Public Policy Forums (09-02-09)

Cloud Forecasting: A New Report (11-12-09)

Model 4: Performance Governance

(a continuation from the December 23, 2009 blog on “Managing Performance”)

Model 3: Performance Management Framework

(a continuation from the December 23, 2009 blog on “Managing Performance”)

Model 2: Siloed Performance Systems

(a continuation from the December 23, 2009 blog on “Managing Performance”)

Model 1: Performance Administration

(a continuation from the December 23, 2009 blog on “Managing Performance”)

Bouckaert and Halligan call their first idealized performance management model the “Performance Administration” approach.

This model is seen as modest, ad hoc and un-systematic. It is oftentimes designed for formal, hierarchical organizations and is seen as mechanistic or compliance-oriented in implementation. Nevertheless, it is the typical starting place for many organizations.

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