Reduce Energy Use: Energy Strategy is Environmentally Prudent Part II

 

Reduce Energy Use: Energy Strategy is Environmentally Prudent Part II

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011 - 14:42
Monday, July 25, 2011 - 14:37
Today, we will focus on the two remaining drivers that play a critical role in an energy strategy: People and Technology.

Yesterday, we introduced three drivers that play a critical role in an energy strategy: People, Process and Technology.  Specifically, we discussed how finding alternative energy resources through processes can help improve operations of the organization, the profitability of the business and ultimately, upon the environment. Today, we will focus on the two remaining drivers that play a critical role in an energy strategy: People and Technology.

People:  Carefree Consumers or Prudent Protectors

People can be the environment’s best allies or its worst foes.  People are the cornerstone of energy strategy.  Their demand for energy has a major effect on natural resources, on business operations and on the environmental footprint.  One Army report cited General David Petraeus communicating the importance each individual plays on operational energy use.  Moreover, General Petraeus expects accountability at all levels; he will begin implementing the new energy strategy by forming a team to assist commanders with measuring and managing unit fuel consumption, and by “standing up an office to change the way coalition forces use operational energy.” 

This shift in putting energy strategy first ensures accountability for how we, as individuals, AND how we, as a nation, utilize our existing energy sources and plan for future energy use.

Energy Security and Technology:  The Climate is Right

Energy security is threatened by political unrest of the countries possessing the energy resource, natural disasters, competition, and direct attack.  That is why renewable energy technologies are solutions that are aligning on the agendas of many organizations.   

When businesses spend dollars to research and deploy geothermal, hydropower, solar and wind projects, we can eliminate our strong dependence upon petroleum and foreign oil, which in turn will help build home-grown businesses and help stabilize the economy.

Energy strategy makes good business sense.

Coming Up Next:

Join us tomorrow as we discuss a real life case study that demonstrates how the Department of Defense is implementing cost savings through the implementation of reducing energy use.

Let Us Hear From You:

How important do you think the roles of People and Technology play in Energy Strategy?  Share your thoughts here!

 

 


Tim Fain Bio Tim Fain is an Associate Partner and Service Area Leader within IBM’s Global Business Services Public Sector. Mr. Fain has more than 30 years of technical, managerial, and consulting experience. Specifically his experience involves developing organizational, economic development and environmental and energy sustainability strategies; improving business models and processes; and helping organizations develop transformation roadmaps. He uses his extensive knowledge of Federal regulatory and budgetary processes, e-Government principles and methodologies, and strategic planning to help public sector clients address policy, service, and transformational challenges.

Prior to joining IBM, Tim spent eight years at the Office of Management and Budget where he worked on a broad range of Federal government information technology and policy issues. A former US Navy Submarine Officer, Tim holds a BS in Metallurgical Engineering, a MA in National Security Studies, and a MPP in International Trade and Finance.

Tim Fain (tfain@us.ibm.com)

 

 


Freda Washington Bredy Freda Washington Bredy is a Managing Consultant with IBM’s Global Business Services, Public Sector Division, Strategy and Innovation Practice. Ms. Bredy has over 15 years of experience managing and consulting public and commercial clients. She holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Tuskegee University, a M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Georgia Tech and an M.B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis. Ms. Bredy has consulted numerous clients including: US Army, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Department of the Interior and Veterans Affairs.

Freda Washington Bredy (freda.bredy@us.ibm.com)