E-Government – Three Vignettes that Still Resonate Today

Vignette 1:  FirstGov (now USA.Gov). In 1999, Eric Brewer -- Internet search pioneer and CEO of the search company Inktomi (which developed search long before Google) met President Clinton at the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos.  Brewer had what was a revolutionary idea at the time – organize all government information in a single search engine, accessible through a single portal, for free.

A Pivotal Moment for Digital Transformation in Government

This post was written by guest bloggers: Justin Cole, Managing Consultant, IBM and Layne Morrison, Senior Managing Consultant, IBM

The “why”

Digital transformation drives new models of doing business – including the ‘business’ of government - as external and internal forces drive unprecedented disruption.

What differentiates this new model?

The Government’s Program Management Story: Taking a Cue from The Big Screen

The US government provides critically needed services through programs in each agency across the nation each day, to a scale of millions of people.  Families receive social security checks, students receive support to attend college, small businesses receive loans – the list goes on and on.  At the same time, the very scale of government services means that a problem in program delivery impacts a very significant portion and geographic scope of the nation.  And such problems echo as advocacy groups, oversight bodies, and media raise legitimate questions about what went wrong, even given the

President’s Management Agendas: What Insights Do the PMA’s Origins Have for the Future?

This week, the release of the Administration’s Fiscal Year 2021 Budget Proposal was accompanied by several management chapters with information about the President’s Management Agenda (PMA).  The PMA reflects a set of initiatives and activities intended to improve the effectiveness and efficiency by which Federal agencies serve their constituents and carry out their mission.  While muc

Designing, developing, and deploying artificial intelligence systems: Lessons from and for the public sector - part three

Previous Center authors Kevin Desouza and Gregory Dawson and I recently wrote a paper on Artificial Intelligence and the public sector that was published in Business Horizons, a Journal of the Kelley School of Business, Indiana University.  This article will appear on our blog in a three-part series to include background infor

Designing, developing, and deploying artificial intelligence systems: Lessons from and for the public sector - part two

Previous Center authors Kevin Desouza and Gregory Dawson and I recently wrote a paper on Artificial Intelligence and the public sector that was published in Business Horizons, a Journal of the Kelley School of Business, Indiana University.  This article will appear on our blog in a three-part series to include background infor

New Research Report Recipients

We are pleased to announce our latest round of stipends for new reports on key public sector challenges, which respond to priorities identified in the Center's research agenda. Our content is intended to stimulate and accelerate the production of practical research that benefits public sector leaders and managers. We expect the following reports to be published in late 2020.

 

Designing, developing, and deploying artificial intelligence systems: Lessons from and for the public sector - part one

Previous Center authors Kevin Desouza and Gregory Dawson and I recently wrote a paper on Artificial Intelligence and the public sector that was published in Business Horizons, a Journal of the Kelley School of Business, Indiana University.  This article will appear on our blog in a three-part series to include background infor

How Open Innovation Can Transform the Government Technology Playing Field

But a key feature of open competitions is the possibility of new entrants who bring innovative play to qualifying tournaments that precede the main tournament. These new entrants can develop approaches that allow them to raise the level of play for all players based on creative strategies, and strong execution.

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Executive Director
IBM Center for The Business of Government
600 14th Street, NW
Second Floor
Washington, DC 20005
United States
(202) 551-9310

Dan Chenok is Executive Director of the IBM Center for The Business of Government. He oversees all of the Center's activities in connecting research to practice to benefit government, and has written and spoken extensively around government technology, cybersecurity, privacy, regulation, budget, acquisition, and Presidential transitions. Mr. Chenok previously led consulting services for Public Sector Technology Strategy, working with IBM government, healthcare, and education clients.

Mr. Chenok serves in numerous industry leadership positions. He is a CIO SAGE with the Partnership for Public Service, Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, Chair of the Cybersecurity Subcommittee of the DHS Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee, Member of the Auburn University Center for Cyber and Homeland Security Board of Directors, Member of the American University IT Executive Council, and Co-Chair of the Senior Executives Association Community of Change for Governance Innovation; previously, he served as Chair of the Industry Advisory Council (IAC) for the government-led American Council for Technology (ACT), Chair of the Federal Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board, and two-time Cybersecurity commission member with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Mr. Chenok also generally advises public sector leaders on a wide range of management issues. Finally, Mr. Chenok serves as an Adjunct Associate Professor with the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas in Austin, teaching at the school's Washington, DC Center. 

Before joining IBM, Mr. Chenok was a Senior Vice President for Civilian Operations with Pragmatics, and prior to that was a Vice President for Business Solutions and Offerings with SRA International.

As a career Government executive, Mr. Chenok served as Branch Chief for Information Policy and Technology with the Office of Management and Budget, where he led a staff with oversight of federal information and IT policy, including electronic government, computer security, privacy and IT budgeting. Prior to that, he served as Assistant Branch Chief and Desk Officer for Education, Labor, HHS, and related agencies in OMB's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Mr. Chenok began his government service as an analyst with the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, and left government service at the end of 2003.

In 2008, Mr. Chenok served on President Barack Obama’s transition team as the Government lead for the Technology, Innovation, and Government Reform group, and as a member of the OMB Agency Review Team.

Mr. Chenok has won numerous honors and awards, including a 2010 Federal 100 winner for his work on the presidential transition, the 2016 Eagle Award for Industry Executive of the Year, and the 2002 Federal CIO Council Azimuth Award for Government Executive of the Year.

Mr. Chenok earned a BA from Columbia University and a Master of Public Policy degree from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

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