A Glimpse of the Future of Government Performance and Results

A decade ago, IBM Center author Shelley Metzenbaum laid out a set of guiding principles for improving federal performance management that include the importance of communicate trends and targets, not just target attainment and ratings, and the need to encourage performance improvement with increased diagnostic analysis, data-driven discussion, and knowledge sharing.

William M. Snyder

William M. Snyder writes and consults to help leaders organize action-learning networks that serve the common good.  He has consulted for 25 years on large-scale change efforts in the private, public, and non-profit sectors with organizations such as AT&T, Colgate-Palmolive, Daimler-Chrysler, McKinsey & Company, the Veterans Administration, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Annie E.

Transforming the National Archives: A Conversation with David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States

The National Archives is more than just the nation's record keeper and protector of records. It is the steward of the American story that preserves the past to protect the future. The records it holds are the original sources of that story, documenting the collective history of our nation through the actions of individuals and institutions.

Throwing Rocks and Birds

In 2002, British academic Jake Chapman wrote a paper for Demos, a UK think tank, entitled: “System Failure:  Why Governments Must Learn to Think Differently.” It is based on his experiences in working with large government challenges, especially in the energy and health care sectors.  In his paper, he contrasts the traditional, linear approach to problem-solving with a more holistic, systemic approach.  He says it is like the difference between throwing a rock and a live bird:

Three Levers for Better Budgeting

A timely new book by veteran public finance experts at the International Monetary Fund describes how budget and finance reforms have evolved over the past two decades in more advanced countries.  While their book doesn’t contain any magic formula for success, it does provide a useful context for understanding what is going on in the field.  It also provides some poor comfort for the fact that what the U.S. is facing is not uncommon and that there may be some avenues for being more successful in the future.

Implementing the DATA Act: Encouraging Signs

The new law gives agencies three years to implement a set of new reporting requirements to track federal spending, but it will be unbelievably complex – requiring changes in federal regulations, and in the written terms of every federal grant, contract, and loan agreement of $25,000 or more.  These changes will likely cascade to agreements between states and localities with their sub-grantees and sub-contractors, as well.  Congressional sponsors of the legislation told the Administration “we’re going to hold your fee

The DATA Act and Transparency: 4 Ways that Industry Will Benefit

Late last week, the President signed into law the Digital Accountability and Transparency (DATA) Act.  As summarized by the Administration’s release statement, the DATA Act will

Transparency, Legitimacy, and Trust

The Open Government movement has captured the imagination of many around the world as a way of increasing transparency, participation, and accountability.  In the US, many of the federal, state, and local Open Government initiatives have been demonstrated to achieve positive results for citizens here and abroad. In fact, the White House’s science advisors released a refreshed Open Government plan in early June.

What Are the DATA Act’s Implications for Federal Agencies?

Previous IBM Center posts about the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act (DATA Act) of 2014 by Dan Chenok (The DATA Act and Transparency: 4 Ways that Industry Will Benefit and The DATA Act Moves Forward) and John Kamensky (Here’s Why DATA Act Implementation May Be Successful) discuss various aspects about the law. This post provides a very brief background to the law and focuses on its implementation implications for Federal agencies.

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